Sisters, Why Are You Throwing Away Your Value? ~ by Sophia Angeli Nelson of “I Am My Sister’s Keeper” [Event Post]

Sisters, Why Are You Throwing Away Your Value? ~ by Sophia Angeli Nelson of “I Am My Sister’s Keeper” [Event Post]

I think it is time we stopped making excuses and turning a blind eye to what has truly become a moral crisis in the black community. Iaskblog.com

Author : Sophia Angeli Nelson

Author's Website | Articles from

Sophia is the Author of the forthcoming non-fiction book:
“Black.Female.Accomplished.Redefined.”
Coming out in Spring 2011.

She is also a noted National Media Commentator and Opinion Writer.

Sophia is Chairman and Founder of the international organization (& website):

I Am My Sister’s Keeper

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I guess I will start with a question: Sister’s why are you giving away your value, your body, and your very being to carry and birth a baby for a man who refuses to “put a ring on it”? A man, who will most likely leave you, neglect your child, and not help you raise him or her to be a loved and valued member of a family and of the greater society.

Lets be honest, we all know that there is no greater issue facing the black community than the crisis of out-of wedlock children. Although, the number of out of wedlock babies has increased in all communities, including for whites (at 30%) no community has the staggering 72% number that has been prevalent for blacks for the past decade.  This number backs up what one sociologist and professor of black studies (Dr. Lerone Bennett) said about a black child in slavery having had a better chance of being raised with both of his parents then, than he does today.

The question we have to ask ourselves is WHY?

I think it is time we stopped making excuses and turning a blind eye to what has truly become a moral crisis in the black community.  And, before we start pointing fingers we know that he data tells us that this phenomenon is not just happening at lower socio-economic levels or with so-called “welfare Queens” but also with middle and higher income sisters as well.  Agreed, that some sisters want to have babies and they hit mid-life (sisters like me) and they make the decision to have a baby on their own.  This is somewhat different because these women are generally able to financial sustain having a family of their own. BUT, (and this is important)—the statistics also tell us that single-head of household black women fare the worst economically, and if they are raising sons alone, those sons are more likely to get in trouble in school, engage in crime, drop-out of school, etc. And what does it do to a young black girl to have no father and be raised by all black women, who are strong, independent and do not have loving men in their lives?

In the final analysis, this issue has become larger than any one individual or segments of individuals.  This issue belongs to the black community as a whole to fix.  It takes a village and our village is in many respects broken.  I applaud Chris Karazin and her efforts to put this issue front and center so that we can call it out for what it is: moral decay in our community.  There was a time not too long ago that having a baby without a father, and being married brought great shame and embarrassment to families. That time no longer exists.  Young girls in high school’s have baby showers during lunch—they celebrate their womanhood by how many babies they can birth—all the while the young men are absent.  We have come to accept the unacceptable as normal. That has to change.

My prayer is that we will all band together—stand-up and say simply “enough” and in doing so spark a movement that will bring our families back together in love, unity and matrimony.

I Am My Sister’s Keeper

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